Frumpfighter

Posts Tagged ‘anxiety

It was almost three years ago my son Sage was diagnosed with Pervasive Development Disorder – Not Otherwise Specified, which falls somewhere on the higher functioning end of the autism spectrum.

Sage learning how to walk at 20 months.

Sage learning how to walk at 20 months.

Then 3 ½ years old, Sage had always shown signs of developmental delays. He didn’t roll over or sit up the same time as other infants did, he couldn’t feed himself on his first birthday as his daycare-mates easily used forks and spoons to devour the cake I made, he didn’t walk until he was 20 months old and only said a few words by his second birthday.

By the time he was 3, it was evident his behavior was different than his peers and his social skills were awkward.  After a series of tests at University of Iowa Children’s Hospital, the doctors determined he had PDD-NOS. They said his case couldn’t be classified as Asperger’s because his speech was so delayed. This irritated me because what did they know about him or his speech after only a few hours?

Although I was in denial, I did agree to speech and occupational therapy. My husband, Jeff, has always been better equipped to handle Sage’s issues (he’ll be a great special education teacher once he complete his master’s degree this fall). It took quite a bit of persuasion from Jeff for me to agree to put Sage in special education preschool in 2007. In my mind, he was just a little behind and didn’t belong in that class.

But the individualized attention was good for him and now he is in kindergarten – on schedule. He is mainstreamed with several special education teachers working with him throughout the day. He is extremely intelligent – he has known his letters and numbers for some time now and can tell you the capital of any state. However, his inability to focus is detrimental to him and his classmates.

A couple of months ago we took him to our general practitioner for an evaluation. It is obvious to anyone that Sage has Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. One of the most common treatments for ADHD is Ritalin, a stimulant. After three days and a minor increase in the dose, Sage became aggressive, hitting his head against the wall and taking swings at teachers and us. The Ritalin was stopped immediately.

Today, at the referral of our general practitioner, we took Sage to a child psychiatrist for further evaluation. Doctor appointments or any activity that requires waiting are always a challenge because of Sage’s hyperactivity. He is usually the loudest, most active child in the room and today was no different. I do get tired of the perceived dirty looks but I realize I’m probably more sensitive to it than I need to be.

Once in the doctor’s office (yes, there was a black leather couch), I was still tense about Sage bouncing off the walls and touching everything. He was in full throttle, which was good for observation. The doctor asked us questions and watched Sage play. At one point, Sage stopped what he was doing and realized we were talking about him. The look on his face nearly broke my heart.  He may be autistic, be he is very sensitive and empathetic.

Sage playing piano at Grandmas at Christmas 2008.

Sage playing piano at Grandma's at Christmas 2008.

The doctor concluded that yes, he does have PDD-NOS and is still not verbal enough to have Asperger’s. He also has ADHD like we suspected. But because he also has anxiety, she said, stimulants like Ritalin have an undesired affect on him. She suggested Strattera for his ADHD. She also suggested eventually putting him on Prozac, an anti-depressant. Again, my heart sank.  I have been diagnosed with clinical depression and have been on a form of Prozac for nearly 10 years. Did I do this to him? When I was pregnant, all I was hoping not to give him was my crazy curly hair. Now he has my anxiety?

We told her about Sage’s intelligence and his love for music, especially the piano. She could tell he is a funny, sweet young boy who, with continued therapy, has great potential.

With time he should develop more skills and learn to focus on pace with his peers. When I asked her about eventual independence, she said that wasn’t outside the realm of possibility. That was music to my ears.

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